Gardening with Georgia

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Beauties, Oddities and Other Delights

Fri, Jun 04, 2010 at 02:55:26 PM

One of the best things about the show and sale of the Tropical Fern and Exotic Plant Society is just how exotic the plants really are. This year’s show includes ferns, lycopodiums, begonias, crotons, orchids and aroids. All of them are wonderfully grown – a remarkable feat after our coldest winter and then hottest May on record. The show is in the Garden House, and not only fills a display in the center of the room, but it runs across the stage as well.

Here are some of the delightful plants you will find Saturday and Sunday.


The striking red flowers of the
monkey tail cactus.

Hildewintera colademononsis, a cactus sometimes called a monkey tail, has pendant stems covered with white hair, from which it sends out rose-red flowers, particularly on the southernmost ends.

Laelia purpurata ‘Schuster’ var. Rochelle has a seriously deep purple lip with striped throat against crystal white sepals and petals will knock your socks off.

Lycopodium gobellei, a gray-green fern ally, is full and proud and


Royal purple is thie lip of this
Laelia purpurata.

obviously grown to perfection.

Doryopteris ludens is a Malaysian fern with broad, star-shaped shield fronds and tall, spidery reproductive fronds. Both types of fronds are hard to the touch and shiny, like polished jade.

Anthurium regale, is a lovely anthurium with, how else can we put this? really regal leaves. Dark green with yellow veins, the leaves are held on two-foot petioles, the better for your admiration.


Anthurium regale's elegant leaf.

A new, creamy-white and green croton is Codiaeum variegatum ‘Lucia’, and has crimped edges similar to those on Piecrust. Like the yellow form of Mrs. Iceton, it will light up shady parts of a garden.

Uncarina roesliana, from Madagascar, is a succulent with a caudex, or a swollen woody base, with fuzzy leaves and yellow tubular flowers.

Only at this show can you find such a weird and wonderful mix of plants.

 


 

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