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Assisted Migration

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

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Never Give Up

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

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What is that purple flowering tree in our rainforest?

Thursday, August 6, 2009

In recent days I've been asked about the tree in the rainforest which is currently flowering. Showy purple flowers appear in the canopy of the Fairchild rainforest. It is Carpodiptera ameliae, a member of the Tiliaceae family, native to Central America. Commonly called mountain pear, it is a 30-40' tall tree with large evergreen leaves. In July and August, a profusion of panicles with many small lavender-rose colored flowers are produced. If you want to see Fairchild's mountain pear, stand ...

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For The Love of Mangos Peru, 2009

Thursday, August 6, 2009

The Curator Noris Ledesma once again delves into the world of mangos with an ambitious agenda of mango hunting and adventure to capture the harsh realities that the Peruvian mango is confronting. The Peruvian mango is an export fruit and Peru is the second country to bring mangos to the United States. Their mangos arrive around Thanksgiving, when other countries' mangos are not ripe. Peru produces many Florida mangos, including Edward' for the local market where the prices...

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Members' Day Plant Sale coming soon....

Thursday, August 6, 2009

MEMBERS' DAY PLANT SALE PRIMER Distribution of rare, unusual plants to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden members has had a long rich tradition in south Florida. In 1939, Fairchild Tropical Garden had the first Members Plant Distribution. To quote David Fairchild from the first list of plants: "In accordance with our policy to grow and distribute plants and palms which are more or less rare in this section, we have now on hand and ready for distribution a limited quantity of plants, a...

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The state of orchids in the wild, brought home

Thursday, August 6, 2009

The Coalition for Orchid Species' annual symposium Aug. 2 brought speakers from California, Texas, New York and Miami to the Garden House. About 80 people happily spent hours focusing on their favorite topic: orchids that occur in the wild. Because of habitat destruction, orchid species are sought by growers and collectors looking for increasingly rare plants. COS was organized in 1990 to stress conservation and educate the public about the diversity of the flowers found in nature. Lee Moore ...

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Put what in your pipe?

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Blooming on the vine pergola is Aristolochia maxima, the Florida Dutchman's pipe, which has the Aristolochia maxima showshairs that trap flies. shape of an old-fashioned meerschaum pipe. It is not native to Florida - it grows from Mexico through Central America and into Venezuela -- but has naturalized here. The clusters of flowers on this woody vine, or liana, are brownish, without the outrageous liver color and really bizarre shape of the larger flowered species, such as...

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Its a Friday night and I'm writing this blog - why?

Friday, August 7, 2009

I don't normally write a blog on a Friday evening, but I just can't contain myself. I feel compelled to shout from my rooftop - Everyone should have this plant in their yard!!!! What plant, you ask? I have a Lady of the Night, Brunfelsia nitida planted near the east side of my house. It has been there about five years. It is absolutely, positively one of my favorite plants! It has been blooming for the past week. The flowers are tubular, opening white and gradually turning shades of ...

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Saving our songbirds with trees

Monday, August 17, 2009

Can warblers find food here? Guided by the stars, the winds, and the Earth's magnetic fields, migratory songbirds - the warblers, thrushes, vireos, tanagers and buntings that spend the summer in North America and the winter in the Caribbean and South America - are beginning to pass through South Florida now. Traveling from 30 to 100 miles a day, the birds need twice the amount of food during migration as they otherwise require. But will they find enough food here to help them...

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A nifty native

Monday, August 17, 2009

Fruit of the Simpson stopperis brightly colored and at-tractive to birds. Among the Florida native plants surrounding the Museum House are Simpson stoppers, now bearing bright red berries that are attractive to a wide variety of birds. Stoppers are under story trees of the evergreen hammocks that generally bear small leaves, white flowers in spring, followed by orange or red fruit. Simpson stopper is Myrcianthes fragrans, and it is useful in a number of ways: as a small tree; in a grouping ...

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Maintaining Optimism

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

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Limitations and Connections

Thursday, August 20, 2009

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Kangaroos

Saturday, August 22, 2009

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Fairchild Gets Recognized

Monday, August 24, 2009

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Reflection and Evaluation

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

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Small but beautiful

Friday, August 28, 2009

Episcia cupreata is a Conservatory beauty.. You have to stoop down to really see them, but the flowers of Episcia cupreata are dramatic once you make the effort. Their tubular flowers have fringes on their edges and red markings in their yellow throat. In the Conservatory, the bright "flame-violet" nestles near the pineapple ginger. Episcia is a member of the gesneriad family, tropical herbs that are often found in the under story of rainforests where humidity is high and light...

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It was “snowing” in the lowlands this morning…..

Friday, August 28, 2009

Early this morning, I was collecting seeds of our pineland crotons to grow on for sales and special projects. As I was walking from our pineland back to my office, I noticed that the sign for Mark di Suvero's She' had "snow" on it. I also saw that the grass in the area had "snow" as well. I looked up, up, up, into the crown of the nearest royal palm and saw that it was flowering. The huge inflorescence of the palm was a creamy white hue, buzzing with...

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Vignettes

Friday, August 28, 2009

Gardens are full of beautiful vignettes, surprises and delights - if you take a few moments to look for them. Strolling with my camera through Fairchild not long ago I came upon two such garden moments: a curled Cecropia leaf and lichens on a palm trunk. Lovely Cecropia leaves, even when fallen. Cecropias are pioneer trees in the rain forest. They have short-lived seeds that germinate in the full sun of a light gap and then race upwards at a dozen feet a year. There are several species of...

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