Javier Francisco-Ortega

Javier Francisco-Ortega, PhD

Professor,
Department of Biological Sciences,
Florida International University

Head of FIU/Fairchild Plant Molecular Systematics Laboratory,
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Fairchild Challenge Post-secondary Advisor,
Department of Education,
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

Phone (Fairchild-CTPC): 305-665-2844 x 3423/3432
Phone (FIU): 305-348-2080
Email: ortegaj@fiu.edu

 


Teaching at Florida International University or Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

    • General Biology 2 (BSC 1011) - Spring 2014 (with Dr. John Cozza). Dr. Ortega will be teaching the first part of this course. Click here for course syllabus. Office hours (OE242): Fridays, noon - 3:00 PM
    • Biogeography (BSC 4303)
    • Evolution (PSB 4674)
    • Biodiversity in the Caribbean Basin (BSC 4363) -Spring 2014. Click here for course syllabus
    • Biodiversity of Tropical Islands (BSC 4361)
    • Plant Molecular Systematics (BOT 5728) (taught at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden)
    • Plant Molecular Systematics Laboratory (BOT 5728L) (taught at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden)

Education Activities at Fairchild

As an educator and plant researcher, I believe firmly that scientists have strong responsibilities to the community and the environment. At Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden there is a long tradition of solid links to the formal education community in South Florida. Through the Fairchild Challenge, a multidisciplinary environmental education outreach program, the Garden has established a unique program touching thousand of elementary, middle, and high school students throughout Miami. This program has gained national and international recognition for being a replicable model of environmental education. In addition, Fairchild hosts four faculty from Florida International University (FIU) in its Center for Tropical Plant Conservation. As a result of these academic bridges, Fairchild has a growing graduate program with FIU and University of Miami. As the Post-seconday Advisor of the Fairchild Challenge, I work with a team that has a strong commitment to developing the next generation of critical thinkers as they move into college education. They will be positive stewards of the environment including preschoolers to college students.  Our education activities are rooted in our community and exemplify the vision and mission of Fairchild of "Exploring, Explaining, and Conserving the World of Tropical Plants." 

Research Activities

My main research interest is plant systematics with a focus on using molecular tools to establish phylogenetic relationships among taxa.  However, I also use “traditional” tools to address systematic questions; they include electron microscopy, morphometrics, anatomy, natural products (micromolecules), nomenclature, and ecogeographical approaches.  I also have an interest in conservation; therefore many of my projects focus on Endangered and Critically Endangered species (sensu IUCN).  These projects use molecular markers  tailored either for population genetics (microsatellites) or for phylogenetics (nucleotide sequences).  Rooted in Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden's strong tradition and commitment to plant exploration, my studies have a strong field component and I also have a major interest in the history of plant exploration. The vast majority of my studies concern plants endemic to tropical and subtropical islands, and they are conducted in close collaboration with colleagues working on these islands.  My laboratory is located in the Center for Tropical Plant Conservation at Fairchild. Finally, my research studies make extensive use of the unique living collections of tropical plants found at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. All of my studies are made in collaboration with colleagues from USA and other countries. My main national partners are botanists from Montgomery Botanical Center and USDA (Miami Station at Chapman Field).

RESEARCH THEMES AND CURRENT RESEARCH


Research Projects

My research activities focus on the following five themes.  They link with the 80 year history of research and conservation at Fairchild.

  • Cycad biodiversity, phylogenetics, and conservation
  • Palm biodiversity, phylogenetics, and conservation
  • Conservation and biodiversity of plants from tropical and subtropical islands
  • Conservation and biodiversity of plants from South Florida
  • History of botany and plant exploration

Within these five themes currently I have the following eight "Active Research Projects":


1.- Plant Biodiversity, Conservation, and Environmental Education in Haiti


As part of the official agreements signed between the Botanic Garden of Cayes, the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic, and the College of Arts and Sciences of Florida International University we are developing three joint projects: (1) Capacity building for botanists, and environmental biologists from Haiti at the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic; (2) Conservation biology of Haitian palms, and (3) Endemism study and checklist of seed-plants from Haiti. These studies build on a ten year fruitful collaboration established with the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic and on the extensive field/taxonomic experience of Dominican Republic botanists. The Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic has played a major role in ex situ conservation of Haitian endemics. The ultimate aim of these agreements is to provide solid educational and research foundations for the successful establishment of the National Botanic Garden of Haiti. In January 2012 we received a grant from the Mohamed Bin Zayed Conservation Funds for our first joint reseach project. This study will focus on conservation biology of the Critically Endangered palm Pseudophoenix lediniana (see furher details below).


Clavija domingensis
- A Critically
Endangered Species from
Haiti which is part of the ex situ conservation collections of the National Botanic Garden
of the Dominican Republic. Photo credit: Scott Zona.


View of the "Flower Clock" at the Botanic Garden of Cayes.

From left to right: Javier Francisco-Ortega, William Cinea, and Ricardo Garcia during signature of letter of intent between Botanic Garden of Cayes and the College of Arts and Sciences of Florida International University.

Pseudophoenix lediniana
 -
A Critically
Endangered Species
from Haiti which is part of
the ex situ conservation collections of the
National Botanic Garden
of the Dominican
Republic. Photo credit: Rosa Rodriguez.
 
Neobuchia paulinae
- A Critically Endangered Species from Haiti which is part of the ex situ conservation collections of the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic. Photo credit: Rosa Rodriguez.

 

2.- Plant Biodiversity, Conservation, and Environmental Education in the Bahamas

In collaboration with colleagues from the Bahamas National Trust, the College of the Bahamas, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, the Leon Levy Nature Plant Preserve, and Florida International University we are developing research projects concerning molecular phylogenetics, biogeographical, and population genetics of plants endemic to these islands. Initial results of these projects will be presented at a symposium that will take place in the Bahamas in October 2012 (see above). These activities have led to two publications concerning conservation genetics of cycads (Oryx, 47: 190-198, 2013) and of the morning glory Ipomoea microdactyla (Plant Species Biology, in press).



3.- Plant Biodiversity and Conservation on Hainan Island


In collaboration with colleagues from several institutes in China, United States, and Abu Dhabi, we have just published the first endemism studies for seed plants from Hainan Island (Botanical Review 76: 295-345; 76: 346-376, 2010). We are also doing a phylogenetic study of Wenchengia (Taxon 61: 392-401, 2012).  This mint genus is endemic in Hainan and its phylogenetic placement has been a mystery. Additional details of the published results (click here) are highlighted by our colleagues from South China Botanic Garden.

Manglietia fordiana var. hainanensis,
(Magnoliaceae) a taxon endemic
to Hainan Island.
Photo credit: X.-Q. Song.
Wenchengia alternifolia (Lamiaceae),
a critically endangered species endemic
in Hainan Island. Photo credit: R.-T. Ling.
Tropical monsoon forest in the protected
area of Diaoluoshan, Hainan Island.
Photo credit: F.-D. Liu.

 



4.- Plant Systematics and Conservation of Seed Plant Genera endemic to the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot


4.1.- Introduction and Overview.--  Plants from the Caribbean Islands are in the core of the educational, horticulture, and research activities of Fairchild and they are one of the main priorities of my laboratory.  We mostly focus on those genera that are endemic to the islands, many of them are critically endangered. Our studies show that they several of these threatened genera have unique phylogenetic patterns and are a priority for conservation. A review paper (Botanical Review: 73:183-234, 2007) published in collaboration with colleagues from the Antilles and USA has helped us to establish our research ;ines within these genera. We have conducted molecular phylogenetic studies with Feddea (Asteraceae), Microcycas (Zamiaceae), and Rhododeron (Asteraceae). The Ph.D. research of one of our previous graduate students and current herbarium curator of Fairchild (Dr. Brett Jestrow) focused on the systematic of the three endemic genera of the Leucocroton alliance (Euphorbiaceae) (i.e., Garciadelia, Lasiocroton, and Leucocroton). This study resulted in the description of a new genus, endemic to the island of Hispaniola (Garciadelia) (Taxon 59: 1801-1814, 2010) and to a historical biogeography reconstruction based on molecular phylogeny tools. Currently out research with endemic genera is focusing on the phylogenetic placement: (1) of the three endemic genera belonging to the Primulaceae (Solonia, Vegaea, and Wallenia) and (2) of Sarcopilea (Urticaceae) a genus endemic to the Dominican Republic (see below).

Feddea cubensis (Asteraceae), a critically
endangered genus endemic to serpentine
soils of Cuba. Photo credit: L. Sanchez.
Lasiocroton bahamensis
(Euphorbiaceae), a species
endemic to lowland limestone
soils of the Bahamas, Cuba,
and a single locality in Haiti.
Photo credit: B. Jestrow.

One of the undescribed species
of Garciadelia Jestrow & Jimenez ined. (Euphorbiaceae), a critically
endangered genus endemic to limestone soils of Hispaniola. Photo credit: B. Jestrow.




 

4.2.- Endemic Genera in the Primulaceae.--  We are performing molecular systematic studies with the Caribbean genera belonging to the Primulaceae. The study is being conducted in collaboration with colleagues from the National Botanic Garden of Cuba (Cristina Panfet), the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic (Francisco Jimenez), the Botanic Garden of the University of Puerto Rico (Eugenio Santiago), and Broward County Extension Education (John Pipoly). The study is led by the curator of the Fairchild Botanic Garden Herbarium (Brett Jestrow) and also involves Fairchild researchers Kathleen Cariaga (currently at USDA-SHRS), Carl Lewis (Executive Director of Fairchild) and FIU-Fairchild graduate student Catherine Bravo.



Plant of Wallenia laurifolia from the living collections
of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. Photo credit:
Eugene Donaldson.



Plant of Vegaea pungens in its natural habitat at high
elevation forests of the Dominican Republic. Photo credit: Ricardo Briones. This species is the symbol of the
"Fundacion Moscoso Puello" from the Dominican Republic.

 
Plant of Solonia reflexa in its natural habitat at high elevation forests of Cuba (Sierra Maestra). Photo credit: Eldis Becquer.

 

4.3.- Sarcopilea (Urticaceae).-- Led by the curator of the herbarium of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (Brett Jestrow) and in collaboration with Fairchild Research Associate (James Valdes) and the Head of the Botany Department of the Jardin Botanico Nacional de la Republica Dominicana (Francisco Jimenez) we have been studying the systematic placement of Sarcopilea. The research (Taxon, 6: 592-600, 2012) has involved molecular, anatomical, electron microscopy, and taxonomic studies. Image on the right. Close up of male individual of Sarcopilea (living collections of Fairchild). Bottom images.- Left: leaf anatomical sections of Sarcopilea (A and B) and two species of Pilea with succulent leaves; right: distribution of Sarcopilea (solid circles) in the Dominican Republic.



5 .-
Conservation
Genetics of Caribbean Cycads

This project is being funded by NSF and it is a collaboration between scientists from USDA-SHRS (Dr. Alan Meerow, Dr. Dayana Salas-Leiva, and Kyoko Nakamura), Montgomery Botanical Center (Dr. Patrick Griffith and Michael Calonje), New York Botanical Garden (Dr. Dennis Stevenson), the National Botanic Garden of Dominican Republic (Francisco Jimenez and Alberto Veloz), the Bahamas National Trust (Lindy Knowles and David Knowles), the Instituto de Ecologia y Sistematica of Cuba (Ramona Oviedo), and FIU-Fairchild (Dr. Javier Francisco-Ortega).  We are using DNA fingerprinting techniques to document levels of genetic diversity in populations of Zamia pumila from the Caribbean Islands and Florida. This species complex occurs in Florida, the Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominican Republic, the Bahamas (Oryx 47: 190-198, 2013), Jamaica, and Puerto Rico (Memoirs of New York Botanic Garden 106: 204-223, 2012; American Journal of Botany 99: 1828-1839, 2012). Our project also aims to determine management units, as they will help to establish conservation priorities. This study has systematic implications as the taxonomic limits between the several morphs of this species complex are not well understood. During our studies we are also recording data on insect  pollination by weevils, and assessing the conservation status and major threads faced by this species complex. The project has also been funded by the National Geographic Society and the Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund.


From left to right: Alberto Veloz, J. Francisco-Ortega, M. Calonje, and F. Jimenez at the National Botanic Garden of Dominican Republic during a joint field trip (2009).



Alan Meerow (foreground) and A. Oberli (background) collecting plant material of Zamia pumila s.l. in Jamaica (2008).


Zamia lucayana, a critically endangered species endemic in Long Island (The Bahamas). Photo credit: M. Calonje.


6.- Conservation Genetics of Pseudophoenix (Arecaceae)

With four species the palm genus Pseudophoenix is restricted to the Antilles, Bahamas, Yucatan, and the Florida Keys.  We have developed a battery of 10 microsatellite loci to address conservation issues within the species of this genus (Conservation Genetics Resources 2: 85-87, 2011).  These markers initially helped us to select plant material for a restoration ecology project of P. sargentii in the Florida Keys and to determine management units for conservation of P. ekmanii in the Dominican Republic (Journal of Heredity 102: 1-10, 2011). Sap from individual trees of P. vinifera and P. ekmanii  is commonly extracted in the Dominican Republic to make a local drink known as "Mabi de Cacheo." Once plants are tapped they usually die. A recent review has shown that this ethnobotanical practice also occurs in other countries from the Old and New World (Vieraea 41: 91-113, 2013). In collaboration with the Montgomery Botanical Center we are also developing plant exploration activities in the region. Our most recent field trip took place at Isla de Mona, in collaboration with Dr. Eugenio Santiago (Universidad de Puerto Rico) and it was supported by the International Palm Society and led by the Montgomery Botanical Center (Dr. Patrick Griffith) (Palms 56: 78-90, 2012). The ultimate aim is to provide an avenue for ex-situ and in-situ conservation and to enhance the living collections of botanic gardens. In January 2012 we received a grant from the Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund to start conservation genetic studies of the Critically Endangered palm Pseudophoenix lediniana. This species is restricted to a single area of southern Haiti, and the study involves researchers from the Botanic Garden of Cayes (Haiti), the National Botanic Garden of the Dominican Republic, FIU-Fairchild, Montgomery Botanical Center, and USDA. Also in 2012 Ms. Rosa Rodriguez, Head of the Conservation Department of the National Botanic Garden of Dominican Republic started her MS under my supervision to conduct conservation genetic studies of species of the genus from Hispaniola.  Her academic work is receiving support by the Fulbright Program, Florida International University, and Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. Field work and research is being supported by the International Palm Society, Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund, and the Montgomery Botanical Center.

Adult individual of Pseudophoenix
ekmanii
at Jaragua National Park,

Dominican Republic. Photo credit:
Scott Zona.
Individual of Pseudophoenix ekmanii
being tapped to produce "Mabi de
Cacheo." Photo credit: Scott Zona.

 

 

7.- Systematics of Island Palms

Ptychosperma microcarpum
Photo credit: Scott Zona.

7.1- Molecular Phyliogenetics of Ptychospermatinae.-- In collaboration with Dr. Scott Zona (FIU), Dr. Carl Lewis (Fairchild), Dr. Brett Jestrow (Fairchild), and Dr. W. Baker (Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew), we are using molecular markers to obtain a molecular phylogeny of the Ptychosperma (American Journal of Botany 98: 1716-1726, 2011) and related genera, a group mostly restricted to the West Pacific Islands. Species of this genus are common in tropical gardens, and Fairchild  has an extensive living collection.

Dr. C. Lewis (left) and Dr. S. Zona (right) at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.


7.2- Morphometrics of Aiphanes minima.-- In collaboration with FIU-Fairchild graduate alumnus Karen Laubengayer (FIU), Dr. Eugenio Santiago (Universidad de Puerto Rico), and Dr. Chad Husby (Montgomery Botanical Center) we have performed a morphological study of Aiphanes minima through its distribution range (Harvard Papers in Botany 17: 299–305, 2012). The species is endemic to the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Rico and one of the aims of the research is to determine if the biogeographical discontinuties exhibited by this species translates into morphological differentiation. Image below: Left (Dr. Eugenio Santiago processing herbarium specimens at the Botanic Garden of the University of Puerto Rico). Right (Karen Laubengayer preparing collecting tools in the field).



8.- Plant Exploration and Botany History

8.1- Pre-Linnean References for the Macaronesian Flora.-- With a focus on the pre-Linnaean collections of the Sloane Herbarium (Natural History Museum, London), we are examining  early plant exploration and taxonomic accounts for the floras of the Macaronesian Islands  (Madeira, Azores, Canaries, and Cape Verde).  Through our research we have found the earliest documented herbaria for Madeira (by Sir Hans Sloane in 1687; Taxon 59: 598-612, 2010), the Canary Islands (by James Cuninghame in 1697; Taxon 60: 1734-1753, 2011), and the Cape Verde Islands (Taxon, in press).  We are also investigating pre-Linnaean references for the cultivation of plants from these islands at botanical gardens of Europe (Revista de la Academia Canaria de Ciencias 23: 113-143, 2012). This research is being undertaken in collaboration with Dr. A. Santos Guerra (Botanic Garden of Orotava, Tenerife), Dr. Lazaro Sánchez-Pinto (Natural Science Museum of Tenerife) Dr. Maria Romeiras and Dr. Maria Cristina Duarte (both at Tropical Botanic Garden of Lisbon), and Dr. M. Carine (Natural History Museum of London).

8.2.- Early accounts for the Flora of Puerto Rico.-- Under the leadership of Dr. Eugenio Santiago (University of Puerto Rico) and in collaboration with Dr. Lazaro Sanchez-Pinto (Natural Sciences Museum of Tenerife) we are also studying the life and works of Domingo Bello y Espinosa, author of the first floristic treatment for Puerto Rico in the late 19th century (Makaronesia: in press).

8.3.- David Fairchild Expeditions to the Canary Islands.--  Another historical project focuses on the three trips that Dr. David Fairchild performed to the Canary Islands in 1903, 1925, 1926, and 1927. During these expeditions Dr. Fairchild visited four islands: Gran Canaria, La Palma, Lanzarote, and Tenerife and collected extensively plant material (Brittonia 64: 421–437, 2012, Lecturas y Conferencias del Estudios Canarios 21: 1-53, 2012). This project is being conducted in collaboration with Janet Mosely, Dr. Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, Marianne Swan, and Nancy Korber.

8.4.- David Fairchild Expeditions to the Bahama Archipelago.-- In 2012 Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden will celebrate the 30th anniversary of the publication of the "Flora of the Bahama Archipelago" published by Donovan Correll and Helen Correll. This work was sponsored by the Garden and during 2012 we will be engaged in several activities in partnership with the Bahamas National Trust. One of them will be to provide a study of David Fairchild's plant hunting trips to the Bahamas. We will search for relevant documents found in the Fairchild archives (housed in the Center for Plant Conservation of David Fairchild) and will try to reconstruct his expeditions to these islands. The study is being performed in collaboration with our Janet Mosely, Marianne Swan, Dr. Brett Jestrow, and Nancy Korber; and with Dr. Ethan Freid (botanist of the Bahamas National Trust) (Botanical Review, in press).

 



 

 

 

 




Magnolia portoricensis

(Magnoliaceae) a Puerto
Rico endemic described
by
Domingo Bello y Espinosa
in 1881. Photo credit:
Dr. Eugenio Santiago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left to right: Dr. C. Jarvis,
Dr. A. Santos-Guerra,
and Dr. M. Carine
examining herbarium specimens
collected by Sir Hans Sloane in Madeira
in 1687.





 





Copper-plate published by J. Petiver

(1709) of  Forsskaolela angustifolia
(Urticaceae, labeled as “2” on plate)
and the lichen Roccella vicentina
(labeled as “12” on plate) based
on plant material collected by J.
Cuninghame on the Island of
La Palma (Canary Islands) in 1697.
By courtesy of the Botany Library of
the Natural History Museum
of London.

 

Participants of the second expedition of the Utowana to the Canary Islands (Santa Cruz de Tenerife, December 25, 1926). From left to right: D. Fairchild, J. Whitehouse. J.M. Dalziel, A.V. Armour, H.H. McKinney, F.W. Schultz, and F.M. Whitehouse. Courtesy of the Fairchild Tropical Garden archives.

 

David Fairchild near a termite nest at Gun Point, Eluthera Island, The Bahamas (January 11, 1932).  Distant view of Gun Point, Eleuthera Island, The Bahamas (January 11, 1932).

 

Molecular Systematics: Data Sets

Ptychosperminae (PRK & RPB2).

 

Education and Training

Laboratory Head, FIU/Fairchild Plant Molecular Systematics Laboratory (1999-present).

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University (2005-present).

Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University (1999-2004).

Lecturer, Departamento de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad de La Laguna, Canary Islands (1997-1998).

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Botany, University of Texas, Austin (1994-1996).

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus (1993).

Ph.D. Biology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom (1992).
Dissertation: “Ecoegography of the Chamaecytisus proliferus complex (Fabaceae) in the Canary Islands.”

M.Sc. Biology, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom (1988).
Thesis: "A study of morphological and isozyme variation in Lathyrus pratensis L. (Fabaceae)."

B.Sc. in Horticulture Sciences, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, Madrid, Spain (1986).



Recent Research Publications (2008 - present)

* = Graduate student; ** = undergraduate student.

ROMEIRAS, M.M.; DUARTE, M.C.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; CARINE, M. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (In press). Botanical exploration of the Cape Verde Islands: from the pre-Linnaean records and collections to the late 18th century floristic accounts and expeditions. Taxon.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; KORBER, N.; SWAN, N.; MOSELY, J.; FREID, E. & JESTROW, B. (In press). Plant hunting expeditions of David Fairchild to The Bahamas. Botanical Review.

JESTROW, B.*; FREID, E.; ARANGO-ARCES, S. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (In press). The Bahamian flora: plant exploration, living collections, and DNA – A journey started in 1963. Botanical Review.

CAREY, E.; GAPE, L.; MANCO, B.N.; HEPBURN, D.; SMITH, R.L.; KNOWLES, L.; KNOWLES. D.; DANIELS, D.; VINCENT, M.A.; FREID, E.; JESTROW, B.; CALONJE, M.; MEEROW, A.W.; GRIFFITH, M.P.; STEVENSON, D.W. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (In press). Plant conservation challenges in the Bahama archipelago. Botanical Review.

FREID, E.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & JESTROW, B. (In press). Endemic seed plants in the Bahamian archipelago. Botanical Review.

SALAS-LEIVA, D.E.; MEEROW, A.W.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; CALONJE, M.; GRIFFITH, M.P.; STEVENSON, D.W. & NAKAMURA, K. (In press). Conserved genetic regions across angiosperms help develop low copy nuclear markers in gymnosperms: an example using cycads. Molecular Ecology Resources.

PRIESTA, H.; **CHIN, C.; VEISAGA, M.L.; COMMOCK, T.; CAMPBELL, K.; JESTROW, B.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & BARBIERI, M. (In press). Volatile constituents of five species of Portlandia (Rubiaceae). Journal of Essential Oil Research.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & ZONA, S. (2013). Sweet sap from palms, a source of beverages, alcohol, vinegar, syrup, and sugar. Vieraea 5: 91-114.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2013). Viera y Clavijo, Arnoldo Santos y los siglos de las luces. Vieraea 41: 5-20.

*GEIGER, J.; MEEROW, A.W.; LEWIS, C.; OVIEDO, R. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2014). Genetic diversity and conservation of Ipomoea microdactyla (Convolvulaceae) – An endemic vine from the Bahamas, Cuba, and Southeastern Florida. Plant Species Biology 29: 2-15.

GRIFFITH, M.P., FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & CRIBRIAN JARAMILLO, A. (2013). Special issue on genetics and plant conservation in Latin America. Botanical Review 79: 447-448.

*OLEAS, N.; MEEROW, A.W. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2013). Molecular markers and conservation of plant species in the Latin-America: the caseof Phaedranassa viridiflora (Amaryllidaceae). Botanical Review 79: 507-527.

CIBRIAN-JARAMILLO, A.; HIRD, A.; *OLEAS, N.; MA, H.; MEEROW, A.W.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & GRIFFITH, M.P. (2013). What is the conservation value of a plant in a botanic garden? Using indicators to improve management of ex situ collections. Botanical Review 79: 559-577.

*OLEAS, N.; JESTROW, B.; CALONJE, M.; PEGUERO, B.; JIMÉNEZ, F.; RODRÍGUEZ-PEÑA, R.; OVIEDO, R.; SANTIAGO-VALENTÍN, E.; MEEROW, A.W.; ABDO, M.; MAUNDER, M.; GRIFFITH, P. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2013). Molecular systematics of threatened seed plant species endemic in the Caribbean Islands. Botanical Review 79:528-541.

SALAS-LEIVA, D.E.; MEEROW, A.W.; *CALONJE, M.; GRIFFITH, M.P.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; STEVENSON, D.W.; NAKAMURA, K.; LEWIS, C.E. & NAMOFF, S. (2013). Phylogeny of the cycads based on multiple single copy nuclear genes: congruence of concatenated parsimony, likelihood, and species tree inference methods. Annals of Botany 112: 1263-1278.

KORBER, N.; GELBERG, L.E.; MOSELY, J.; SWAN, M.; FREID, E.; JESTROW, B. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2013). The unpublished autobiography of Donovan Correll (1908-1983): accounts on Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and Bahamian Plants. Moscosoa 18: 85-103.

*CALONJE, M.; MEEROW, A.W.; KNOWLES, L.; KNOWLES, D.; GRIFITH, P.; NAKAMURA, K. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2013). Cycad biodiversity in the Bahama Archipelago and conservation genetics of the Critically Endangered Zamia lucayana (Zamiaceae). Oryx 47: 190-198.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; MOSELY, J. L.; KORBE, N. & SWAN, M. (2012). David Fairchild expeditions to the Canary Islands. Plant collections and research outcomes. Brittonia 64: 421–437.

*LAUBENGAYER, K.; ZONA, S.; SANTIAGO-VALENTIN, E.; HUSBY, C. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Morphometric analysis of Aiphanes minima (Arecaceae) across the Antilles. Harvard Papers in Botany 17: 299–305.

MEEROW, A.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; *CALONJE, M.; GRIFFITH, M.P.; AYALA-SILVA, T.; STEVENSON. D. & NAKAMURA, K. (2012). Zamia (Cycadales: Zamiaceae) on Puerto Rico: asymmetric genetic differentiation and the hypothesis of multiple introductions. American Journal of Botany 99: 1828-1839..

MEEROW, A.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; AYALA-SILVA, T.; STEVENSON. D. & NAKAMURA, K. (2012). Population genetics of Zamiain Puerto Rico, a study with ten SSR loci. Memoirs of New York Botanical Garden 106: 204-223.

*MOYNIHAN, J.; STEVENSON, D.Wm.; LEWIS, C.E.; VOVIDES, A.P.; CAPUTO, P. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). A phylogenetic study of Dioon Lind. (Zamiaceae, Cycadales), based on morphology, nuclear ribosomal DNA, a low copy nuclear gene and plastid RFLPs. Memoirs of New York Botanical Garden 106: 448-479.

*MOYNIHAN, J.; GONZALEZ-ASTORGA, J.J.; VOVIDES, A.P.; & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Population genetic diversity in the Dioon edule Lindl. species complex (Zamiaceae, Cycadales): Evidence from microsatellite data. Memoirs of New York Botanical Garden 106: 224-249.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). David Fairchild y sus expediciones biológicas a las Islas Canarias. Lecturas y Conferencias del Estudios Canarios 21: 1-53.

GRIFFITH, M.P.; SUSTACHE SUSTACHE, J.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & SANTIAGO-VALENTIN, E. (2012). Cactus, succulent, and pachycaul flora of Mona Island. Haseltonia 18: 59–69.

*OLEAS, N.; MEEROW, A.W. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Population dynamics of the endangered plant, Phaedranassa tunguraguae, from the Tropical Andean hotspot. Journal of Heredity 103: 557-569.

SANTIAGO-VALENTÍN, E.; SUSTACHE-SUSTACHE, J.; *CIELO FIGUEROLA, C.; *FUMERO-CABÁN, J.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & GRIFFITH, P. (2012). Pseudophoenix sargentii on Mona Island: Conservation survey and a new discovery. Palms 56: 78-90.

JESTROW, B.; VALDES, J.J.; JIMENEZ RODRIGUEZ, F. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Phylogenetic placement of the Dominican Republic endemic genus Sarcopilea (Urticaceae). Taxon 6: 592-600.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; SANCHEZ-PINTO, L. & MAUNDER, M. (2012). Early cultivation of Macaronesian plants in three European botanic gardens. Revista de la Academia Canaria de Ciencias 23: 113-143.

LI, B.; XU, W.; TU, T.; WANG, Z.; OLMSTEAD, R.G.; PENG, H.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; CANTINO, P.D. & ZHANG, D. (2012). Phylogenetic position of Wenchengia (Lamiaceae): a taxonomically enigmatic and critically endangered genus. Taxon 61: 392-401.

JESTROW, B.; GUTIERREZ, J. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Islands within islands: a molecular phylogenetic study of the Leucocroton alliance (Euphorbiaceae) across the Caribbean Islands and within the serpentinite archipelago of Cuba. Journal of Biogeography 39: 452-464.

*TRUSTY, J.; TYE, A.; COLLINS, T.M.; MICHELANGELI, F.A.; MADRIZ, P. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2012). Galapagos and Cocos Islands: geographically close, botanically distant. International Journal of Plant Sciences 173: 36-53.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; JARVIS, C.E.; CARINE, M.A.; MAUNDER, M. (2011). Los herbarios más antiguos de las Islas Canarias. Makaronesia 13: 98-111.

ZONA, S.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; JESTROW, B.; BAKER, W.J. & LEWIS, C.E. (2011). Molecular phylogenetics of the palm subtribe Ptychospermatinae (Arecaceae). American Journal of Botany 98: 1716-1726.

SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; JARVIS, C.E.; CARINE, M.A.; MAUNDER, M. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2011). Late 17th century herbarium collections from the Canary Islands: the plants collected by James Cuninghame in La Palma. Taxon 60: 1734-1753.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; JARVIS, C.E.; CARINE, M.A.; MAUNDER, M. & (2011). Las colecciones de herbario mas antiguas de Canarias. Makaronesia 13: 98-111.

MAUNDER, M.; *ABDO, M.; BERAZAIN, R.; CLUBBE, C.; JIMENEZ, F.; LEIVA, A.; SANTIAGO-VALENTIN, E.; *JESTROW, B. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2011). The plants of the Caribbean Islands: A review of the biogeography, diversity and conservation of a storm battered biodiversity hot-spot. In: Bramwell, D. & Caujapé-Castells, J. (eds.). Pp. 154-178. The biology of island floras. Cambridge University Press, London.

*TRUSTY, J.L.; KESLER, H.C.; RODRIGUEZ, J. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2011). Conservation status of endemic plants on Isla del Coco, Costa Rica: Applying IUCN Red List criteria on a small island. In: Bramwell, D. & Caujapé-Castells, J. (eds.). Pp. 452-473. The biology of island floras. Cambridge University Press, London.

TYE, A. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2011). Origins and evolution of Galapagos endemic vascular plants. In: Bramwell, D. & Caujapé-Castells, J. (eds.). Pp. 89-153. The biology of island floras. Cambridge University Press, London.

NAMOFF, S., VELOZ, A.; JIMÉNEZ, F.; RODRÍGUEZ-PEÑA, R.A.; PEGUERO, B.; LEWIS, C.; *MOYNIHAN, J.; *ABDO, M.; MAUNDER, M.; VON WETTBERG, E.; MEEROW, A.W.; GRIFFITH, M.P. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2011). Sweet drinks are made of this: Conservation genetics of an endemic palm species from the Dominican Republic. Journal of Heredity 102: 1-10.

NAMOFF, S.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; ZONA, S. & LEWIS, C.E. (2010). Microsatellite markers developed for the Caribbean palm Pseudophoenix sargentii - Two PCR-based methods. Conservation Genetics Resources 2: 85-87.

*JESTROW, B.; JIMENEZ, F. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2010). Generic delimitations in the Antillean Adelieae (Euphorbiaceae) with the description of the Hispaniolan endemic genus, Garciadelia. Taxon 59: 1801-1814.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; WANG, F.-G.; WANG, Z.-S.; XING, F.-W.; LIU, H.; XU. H.; XU, W.-X.; LUO, Y.-B.; SONG, X.-Q.; GALE, S.; BOUFFORD, D.E.; MAUNDER, M. & AN, S.-Q. (2010). Endemic seed plant species from Hainan Island: A checklist. Botanical Review 76: 295-345.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; WANG, Z.-S.; WANG, F.-G.; XING, F.-W.; LIU, H.; XU. H.; XU, W.-X.; LUO, Y.-B.; SONG, X.-Q.; GALE, S.; BOUFFORD, D.E.; MAUNDER, M. & AN, S.-Q. (2010). Seed plant endemism on Hainan Island: A framework for conservation actions. Botanical Review 76: 346-376.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; JARVIS, C.E.; CARINE, M.; SEQUEIRA, M. & MAUNDER, M. (2010). Early British collectors of the Macaronesian flora: From Sloane to Darwin. In: Williams, D.M. & Knapp, S. (eds.). Pp. 125-141. The branching of a paradigm: Beyond cladistics. University of California Press, Berkeley.

NAMOFF, S.; HUSBY, C.; NOBLICK, L.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; LEWIS, C. & GRIFFITH, M.P. (2010). How well does a botanical garden collection of a rare palm capture the genetic variation in a wild population? Biological Conservation 143: 1110-1117.

**NAMOFF, S.; LUKE, Q.; JIMENEZ, F.; VELOZ, A.; LEWIS, C.E.; SOSA, V.; MAUNDER, M.& FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2010). Molecular phylogenetics of Jacquemontia ovalifolia (Convolvulaceae) - A biogeographical disjunction between Africa, the Caribbean, and the Hawaiian Islands. Journal of Plant Research 123: 57-65.

SEQUEIRA, M.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; JARVIS, C.E.; OBERLI, A.; CARINE, M.; MAUNDER, M. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2010). The Madeiran plants collected by Sir Hans Sloane in 1687, and his descriptions. Taxon 59: 598-612.

*OJEDA, I.; FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. & CRONK, Q.C.B. (2009). Evolution of petal epidermal micromorphology in Leguminosae and its use as a marker of petal identity. Annals of Botany 104: 1099-1110.

*OLEAS, N.H.; MEEROW, A.W. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2009). Eight microsatellite loci in Phaedranassa schizantha Baker (Amaryllidaceae) and cross-amplification in other Phaedranassa species. Conservation Genetics 10: 1887-1889.

*ANDRUS, N.; TYE, A.; NESOM, G.; BOGLER, D.; LEWIS, C.; NOYES, R.; JARAMILLO, P. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2009). Phylogenetics of Darwiniothamnus (Asteraceae: Astereae) - Molecular evidence for multiple origins in the endemic flora of the Galápagos Islands. Journal of Biogeography 36: 1055-1069.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A. & BACALLADO, J.J. (2009). Biology – Canary Islands. In: Gillespie, R.G. & Clague, D.A. (eds.). Pp. 127-133. Encyclopedia of Islands. University of California Press.

FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J.; SANTOS-GUERRA, A.; CARINE, M. & JARVIS, C. (2008). Plant hunting in Macaronesia by Francis Masson: The plants sent to Linnaeus and Linnaeus filius. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 157: 393-428.

*THORNTON, H.E.B.; RONCAL, J.; LEWIS, C.E.; MASCHINSKI, J. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2008). Conservation genetics of Jacquemontia reclinata (Convolvulaceae), an endangered species from Southern Florida: Implications for restoration management. Biotropica 40: 507-514.

CARIAGA, K.A.; PRUSKI, J.F.; OVIEDO,R.; ANDERBERG, A.A.; LEWIS, C.E. & FRANCISCO-ORTEGA, J. (2008). Phylogenetic and taxonomic placement of Feddea Urban (Asteraceae): An enigmatic and highly threatened genus endemic to eastern Cuba. Systematic Botany 33: 193-202.

 

Recent Grants and Awards

Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Funds. “Conservation action plan and taxonomic verification of a new Critically Endangered species of palm (Pseudophoenix sp. nova) from the Dominican Republic”.  In collaboration with the Dominican Republic National Botanic Garden [Ms. Rosa Rodriguez (PI) and Teodoro Clase (co-PI)] and Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden [Dr. Brett Jestrow (co-PI)].

Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Funds. “Conservation Action Plan for Pseudophoenix lediniana, a palm species endemic to Haiti”.  In collaboration with the Botanic Garden of Cayes [Mr. William Cinea (PI)], the National Botanic Garden of Dominican Republic [Mr Alberto Veloz (co-PI)], Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden [Dr. Brett Jestrow (co-PI)], Montgomery Botanical Center [Dr. Patrick Griffith (co-PI)], and USDA [Dr. Alan Meerow (collaborator)]. 2012-2013.

National Science Foundation. "Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the Caribbean Zamia clade". This is a team project with four PIs: Dr. Alan Meerow (USDA), Dr.Patrick Griffith (Montgomery Botanical Center), Dr. Dennis Stevenson, and Dr. Javier Francisco-Ortega. 2011-2013.

Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Funds. “Conservation action plan for Zamia lucayana, a cycad species endemic to the Bahamian archipelago (Caribbean Island Biodiversity Hotspot)”.  In collaboration with the Bahamas National Trust (Ms. Tamica Rahming), the Montgomery Botanical Center (Mr. Michael Calonje), and USDA (Dr. Alan Meerow). 2010-2011.

Mohamed Bin Zayed Species Conservation Funds. “Conservation Action Plan for Pseudophoenix ekmanii Burret, a palm species endemic to Barahona, Dominican Republic, Caribbean Island Biodiversity Hotspot”.  In collaboration with the National Botanic Garden of Dominican Republic [Mr Alberto Veloz (PI)]. 2010-2011.

International Palm Society. "Collecting Pseudophoenix sargentii on the Island of Mona, Puerto Rico". In collaboration with Montgomery Botanical Center [Dr. Patrick Griffith (PI)] and Botanic Garden of the University of Puerto Rico [Dr. Eugenio Santiago(co-PI)]. 2011.

 

Supervised Graduate Students

Nicole Andrus (M.S., 2002), Hannah Thornton (M.S. 2003), Susan Carrara (M.S., 2004; Research Advisor: Dr. Richard Campbell), Nora Oleas (M.S., 2004; Research Advisor: Dr. Alan Meerow), Jennifer Trusty (Ph.D., 2004), Jeremy Moynihan (Ph.D., 2008), Brian Sidoti (M.S., 2007; Research Advisor: Dr. Scott Zona), Karen Laubengayer (M.S., 2008; Research Advisor: Dr. Scott Zona), Nora Oleas (Ph.D., 2011; Research Advisor: Dr. Alan Meerow), Brett Jestrow (Ph.D., 2010), Michael Calonje (Ph.D., in progress; Research Co-Advised with Dr. Alan Meerow), Rosa Rodriguez (M.S., in progress).

A list of student publications can be found in here.

 

Last updated: December 31, 2013